POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW POSITION: PEDIATRIC ANXIETY/ DEPRESSION CLINICAL RESEARCH STUDIES

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW POSITION: PEDIATRIC ANXIETY/ DEPRESSION CLINICAL RESEARCH STUDIES

Applications are being accepted for a clinical-research post‑doctoral position in childhood anxiety/depression. Applicants must have a doctorate in a relevant area of study, excellent oral and written communication skills, experience in conducting clinical research and data analysis, experience in school/community settings, and training in cognitive-behavior therapy preferred. The applicant should have the organizational skills necessary to manage the daily operations of a large-scale randomized controlled trial implemented in numerous schools/clinics. The fellow will be involved in all aspects of the study including (but not limited to): recruitment, outreach, training, supervision of study staff, and data management and analysis, manuscript preparation, and publications. Opportunities for grant writing and transition to faculty are possible. Start date is flexible. Interested applicants should send an email with their curriculum vitae, up to three published research papers, a brief statement of research interests and goals, and three letters of recommendations to Golda S. Ginsburg, Ph.D. at the UConn Health Department of Psychiatry: gginsburg@uchc.edu

Schmid College Fellows

The Schmid College of Science and Technology at Chapman University is accepting applications for its new postdoctoral teaching and research fellows program, with appointments beginning in summer 2017 for two years (a third year extension possible). Schmid College Fellows are outstanding early-career scientists who provide innovative teaching and mentorship to undergraduate students in our Grand Challenges Initiative (http://www.chapman.edu/GCI), as well as advance independent research in collaboration with a member of the faculty. Fellows are offered a competitive salary, benefits, research support, and personalized professional development in teaching and research.

For this initial cohort, Schmid is seeking to recruit four (4) individuals from across a broad range of the sciences. The PhD or equivalent degree must have been awarded within the last five years; candidate must have no more than five years of prior postdoctoral experience. International students are eligible to apply. More details are provided in the attached advertisement and at the following link: https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/8460.

Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship in Developmental Psychology at the University of Michigan

Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship in Developmental Psychology at the University of Michigan

Applications are now being accepted for a 2-year NICHD post-doctoral research fellowship in Developmental Science at the University of Michigan. The Developmental Area within the Department of Psychology will award one post-doctoral fellowship with a start date between January 15 and April 30, 2017. The successful applicant must complete all requirements for the PhD before the post-doctoral fellowship can begin; however, it is not necessary that the degree be conferred before the start date.

The objective of the fellowship is to train individuals on three pillars of knowledge: (1) developmental science of social context; (2) human neurobiology, including brain imaging, genetics, epigenetics, and endocrine function; and (3) advanced research methods (e.g., quantitative statistics appropriate for combining and analyzing longitudinal data from different levels of functioning). This cross-training will produce researchers well-positioned to develop cutting-edge work that advances knowledge about how neurobiological factors interact with environmental contexts to influence development across several domains and contexts.

The Developmental Area faculty has a broad range of research interests across the life-span from infancy to late adulthood. Interested applicants should check the developmental area’s website and view the list of core faculty and their research interests.

http://lsa.umich.edu/psych/program-areas/developmental-psychology.html

In addition to core faculty in the Developmental Area, the training grant includes five additional investigators at the University of Michigan: Bill Gehring (Psychology), Richard Gonzalez (Psychology), Colter Mitchell (Institute for Social Research), Patricia Reuter-Lorenz (Psychology), and Sari van Anders (Psychology).

Candidates will identify two advisors; one will provide training in social context and the other in neurobiology. In a research statement, the candidate will describe a project that combines these areas of research. It is suggested that the candidate discuss these plans with potential advisors. Fellows are expected to be actively engaged in research during their appointment and will receive additional training in the responsible conduct of research, grant writing, manuscript preparation, and professional development.

Qualifications:

The successful candidate will have a Ph.D. in psychology, human development, neuroscience, or related fields, and have a record of research accomplishment in child or life-span development. The individual must be a US citizen or a non-citizen national of the US or have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence in the US. Salary is in line with NIH pay scale. Offer includes full UM health benefits and travel to one conference per year.

Submit CV, cover letter, statement of research interests, and evidence of scholarly publications no later than December 1, 2016. All materials should be uploaded as a PDF to https://psychology-lsa.applicantstack.com/x/detail/a2s9hql5tpfx. When submitting the material, applicants will be prompted to identify three people who will submit letters of recommendation.page1image23456page1image23616

The University of Michigan, as an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action. The University of Michigan is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, disability, religion, height, weight, or veteran status in employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions.

 

Yale School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry Division of Prevention and Community Research and The Consultation Center

Yale School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
Division of Prevention and Community Research and The Consultation Center
 
Postdoctoral Fellowship
The Division of Prevention and Community Research, Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine invites applications for a two-year NIDA T32 postdoctoral research training program in substance abuse prevention. Applications are now being accepted for an immediate start date for one fellow and a July 2017 start date for two fellows.
The program emphasizes five research training aims: 1) to understand substance use/abuse and related behaviors within an ecological framework that emphasizes relevant developmental, family, social, cultural, and neurobiological contexts; 2) to enhance knowledge development and application in pre-intervention, implementation, and dissemination research; 3) to learn state-of-the-art data analytic methods that incorporate rigorous field and laboratory research methods, including mixed method designs when appropriate; 4) to gain experience in interdisciplinary research through collaborations with scientists in other departments, centers, and programs; and 5) to increase knowledge about the translation of research into real-world contexts that impact prevention practice and policy, and ultimately, public health.

Postdoctoral fellows participate in core seminars on Research and Data Analytic Methods, Grant Development, and Professional Development as well as in seminars and colloquia that cover related topics, such as the ethical conduct of research and current topics in substance abuse prevention. Fellows also receive mentor-based training on at least two scientific projects while working concurrently with two core faculty who serve as their scientific advisors. Faculty available to serve as mentors are located in several research divisions in the Department of Psychiatry, such as the Division of Prevention and Community Research, the Division on Addictions, the School of Public Health, the Yale Stress Center, the Yale Child Study Center, and Women’s Health Research at Yale.

Competitive candidates should have: 1) a Ph.D. in community, clinical, developmental, counseling, or health psychology, or a doctoral degree in public health, family studies, social work, or social welfare; 2) a strong research background; and 3) interest in pursuing an academic career. Applicants should email a CV, representative reprints, a statement of interests and future goals, identification of up to three faculty members with whom they wish to work listed in order of priority (see Scientific Projects Listed by Faculty Member below) and three letters of recommendation to the Training Co-Director, Tami P. Sullivan at: tami.sullivan@yale.edu. Reviews of applications will begin immediately and continue until positions are filled. Yale University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and minority group members are encouraged to apply.

Scientific Projects Listed by Faculty Member

All fellows work with two faculty scientific advisors, and as part of their application, are asked to identify up to three faculty with whom they wish to work, listed in order of priority. Once matched with two faculty scientific advisors, fellows join research teams based on their interests and experience.

 Cindy A. Crusto, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology) and Director, Program and Service System Evaluation at The Consultation Center.  Dr. Crusto’s program of research examines the impact of psychological trauma (e.g., family and community violence) on children, and ecological influences on child and family well-being.  Dr. Crusto also studies social processes and influences on the health and development of young children, including parent experiences of racism, neighborhood context, and substance use. Opportunities are available to join: (a) an NIH-funded study on the influence of child factors, and broader social determinants and processes on young children’s health; (b) an NIH-funded study that evaluates the impact of (GXE) genetic and psychological environmental factors (discrimination, depression, parenting behaviors, substance use) on the health of African American children aged 3 to 5 years and their mothers; and (c) a foundation-funded evaluation of mobile phone text messaging (Short Message Service, SMS) support groups to provide peer and professional support for adolescents living with HIV in South Africa.
 
Derrick M. Gordon, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology) and Director, of Research, Policy and Program on Male Development at The Consultation Center.  His program of research seeks to identify factors that impact men and boys’ healthy family and community functioning. In this work attention is paid to factors such as community violence, poverty, incarceration, substance use, school truancy, parenting, social supports, masculinity, educational outcomes, intimate partner violence, and their impact on the functioning of men and boys. Dr. Gordon is also interested in understanding how young men use preventive health care services and identifying factors that either facilitate or inhibit access. This research seeks to understand the resources needed to support men and boys to successfully attain the skills needed to assume productive roles in their family and community systems.
 
Joy S. Kaufman, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology), Deputy Director for Operations at The Consultation Center and Director of Evaluation Research within the Division of Prevention and Community Research.  Her research program examines contextual factors, such as exposure to violence, substance use and familial stress that impact outcomes for populations at risk. Utilizing qualitative and quantitative methods including community-based participatory research, Dr. Kaufman and her team evaluate the implementation of evidenced-based practices within community-based networks of care and the impact of system functioning on service recipient outcomes. The fellow would have the opportunity to: (a) join a team evaluating the implementation and outcomes of statewide system of care for children with severe emotional and behavioral issues (youth substance use, exposure to traumatic events, parental stress, youth outcomes); and/or (b) join a team evaluating the implementation and outcomes of a multi-site national evaluation of model programs to reduce the rate of homicide resulting from domestic violence.
 
Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychiatry, Vice-Chair of the Human Investigations Committee at Yale School of Medicine, and Co-PI on a P50 center focused on tobacco regulatory research.   Her research is focused on developing a bio-behavioral understanding of the underpinnings of alcohol, tobacco (nicotine) and marijuana use, in adolescent and adult populations, and developing new pharmacological and behavioral interventions to reduce and prevent use of these substances. She is also conducting qualitative and quantitative tobacco regulatory research in adolescents. The fellow would be involved in analyzing evidence from an ongoing study that is conducting surveys with middle and high school adolescents and college-aged young adults to assess use rates and perceptions and attitudes towards modified risk tobacco products, as well as analyzing evidence from an ongoing high school-based smoking cessation trial.
 
Linda C. Mayes, M.D., the Arnold Gesell Professor of Child Psychiatry, Pediatrics, and Psychology in the Child Study Center, is Chair of the Child Study Center, Special Advisor to the Dean of the Yale School of Medicine; and Chief, Department of Child Psychiatry at Yale-New Haven Hospital.  Helena J. V. Rutherford, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Child Study Center, and Course Tutor for the UCL-Yale Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology MRes Course. Drs. Mayes and Rutherford use multi-modal imaging methods to study the impact of addiction on mothers’ neural response to infant cries and faces and its association with caregiving behaviors, with an emerging focus on women during pregnancy in their transition to motherhood, as well as fathers. The Fellow would have access to the collection and analysis of behavioral, EEG/ERP and fMRI data in substance-using parent populations.   
 
Sherry McKee, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Yale Behavioral Pharmacology Laboratory; and Clinical Director, Forensic Drug Diversion Clinic. Her research is focused on improving treatment for those with nicotine and alcohol use disorders. Using a transdisciplinary perspective, she uses human laboratory paradigms, survey research, epidemiological research, and policy research to uncover the mechanisms underlying poor outcomes and translate these findings into improved interventions. In particular, Dr. McKee is interested in improving treatment outcomes for women and those with criminal justice involvement. Dr. McKee leads a large interdisciplinary research effort to develop smoking cessation interventions that are sensitive to gender differences in smoking behavior. Researchers spanning diverse areas of expertise (e.g., molecular biology, neuroimaging, pharmacology, pharmacogenetics, health economics, policy) are collaborating to develop effective interventions for female and male smokers. Dr. McKee also leads a SAMSHA-funded partnership between Yale and the State of Connecticut Department of Corrections and Department of Addiction and Mental Health Services to improve addiction outcomes in offenders who are re-entering their communities following incarceration.
 
Stephanie S. O’Malley, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychiatry; Director, Division of Substance Abuse Research in Psychiatry, and Deputy Chair, Clinical Research. Her research uses human laboratory methods and clinical trials methods to investigate alcohol and tobacco use behaviors and the prevention of long-term problems.  She is co-PI of the Yale Tobacco Center for Regulatory Research and has expertise in tobacco use including emerging products. Of particular focus, her research examines young adults at risk for alcohol or tobacco dependence by virtue of family history and secondary prevention studies for preventing progression of heavy drinking patterns in young adults.  Fellows have access to several large data sets for secondary analyses as well as the opportunity to develop new studies.
 
Marc N. Potenza, Ph.D., M.D, is Professor of Psychiatry, in the Child Study, and of Neuroscience; Director, Center of Excellence in Gambling Research; Director, Yale Program for Research on Impulsivity and Impulse Control Disorders; Director, Women and Addictive Disorders, Women’s Health Research at Yale. His research is focused on the substance and non-substance (behavioral) addictions, with the latter including excessive or problematic engagement in gambling, gaming, Internet use, sex, shopping or eating.   He and his group utilize multiple approaches including brain imaging (fMRI, sMRI, DTI and PET), genetic, pharmacological, behavioral, cognitive, survey, and other assessments.  Data from completed and ongoing studies that are available include those from or involving youth (particularly adolescents) and adults at-risk or with addictions, including longitudinal data.  Data from multiple modalities (e.g., relating brain imaging measures to clinical outcomes in the treatment of addictions) are available from completed and ongoing studies.  Similarly, data from completed and ongoing studies of mother/child interactions that include maternal neural responses to infant stimuli in substance-using and non-substance-using mothers are available for study.
 
Carolyn E. Sartor, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. Her program of research is aimed at refining etiological models of substance use disorders in adolescents and young adults by integrating a developmental psychopathology perspective with genetically-informative designs. The identification of differences by gender and race/ethnicity in the contribution of various risk and protective factors to substance use behaviors is central to this pursuit. Dr. Sartor studies the progression through stages of substance use (e.g., initiation, onset of symptoms) and the timing of stage transitions in relation to the onset of psychiatric disorders and trauma exposure, with a particular focus on the influence of childhood sexual abuse on the course of alcohol and drug use in women. Fellows have access to data from multiple large-scale longitudinal studies of substance use and trauma for secondary data analysis as well as opportunities to develop new data collection projects.
 
Rajita Sinha, Ph.D., is Foundations Fund Professor of Psychiatry and Professor in the Child Study and of Neuroscience; Director, Yale Interdisciplinary Stress Center; Chief, Psychology Section in Psychiatry; and Co-Director of Education, Yale Center for Clinical Investigation.  Her research is focused on the mechanisms linking stress to addiction and seeks to: (a) elucidate sex-specific neurobiological mechanisms underlying stress in humans; (b) examine neurobiological alterations in stress and reward circuits associated with addictive disorders; and (c) develop effective addiction prevention and treatment strategies that target stress and emotion regulation in individuals both at-risk for and those with addiction problems. These objectives are accomplished through various NIH funded research projects available for fellow involvement.
 
Megan V. Smith, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, in the Child Study Center and of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); and Director, New Haven Mental health Outreach for MotherS (MOMS) Partnership.  Dr. Smith's work is focused on community-partnered or community-based participatory research and the co-creation of interventions to address depressive anxiety and addictive disorders among low-income, racial and ethnic minority women and their children.  Dr. Smith's current projects include: (1) a mobile health technology intervention to prevent relapse to smoking in the postpartum period for low-income women; (2) a study to examine the acceptability and feasibility of collecting biomarkers in community settings to assess toxic stress among mothers and young children, and (3) a longitudinal, randomized neighborhood study focused on the delivery of interventions to address maternal mental health and economic stability for families in novel community settings such as supermarkets and public housing complexes.
 
Tami P. Sullivan, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology); Co-Director, Division of Prevention and Community Research; and Director, Family Violence Research and Programs. Her program of research centers on individual- and system-level factors that affect the wellbeing of women victims of intimate partner violence (IPV). At the individual level, she conducts risk and protective factor research and is particularly interested in applying micro-longitudinal designs such as experience sampling methods and conducting research that informs the development of interventions to be implemented in community settings. Specifically, Dr. Sullivan focuses on advancing knowledge of IPV, posttraumatic stress, substance use, and HIV/sexual risk – as well as other co-occurring problems. At the system-level, she focuses on understanding the capacity of systems (e.g., criminal justice system) to meet the unique needs of IPV-exposed women.
 
Nadia L. Ward, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology) and Director of Urban Education & Policy Research, and Michael J. Strambler, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology), at The Consultation Center. Drs. Ward and Strambler’s research focuses on the prevention of problem behaviors such as substance abuse and other negative social, behavioral, and academic outcomes among adolescents. Currently, Dr. Ward is the PI for two seven-year longitudinal studies of a comprehensive urban school reform initiative that is designed to support the social-emotional, academic, and health outcomes among 3,000 urban middle and high school students. Fellows are invited to examine questions of interest with the datasets from these studies and they have opportunities to participate in the implementation of innovative school-based intervention approaches. A second project examines the influence of stress and coping on primary- and mental health outcomes among mother-adolescent dyads and the buffering effect coping has outcomes of interest for both mothers and teens. This study uses a mixed methods approach to understand the phenomenological experience of low-income, single mothers and their teenage children as relates to stress and coping.
 
 
 

Postdoctoral Research Scholar Position at Penn State University—University Park

Postdoctoral Research Scholar Position at Penn State University—University Park

The Cognition, Affect, and Temperament Laboratory at Penn State University, headed by Dr. Koraly Pérez-Edgar, and The Emotion Development Lab at Penn State University, headed by Dr. Kristin Buss, seek a Postdoctoral Scholar (http://emotiondev.la.psu.edu, http://www.catlabpsu.com). Start date of June 2017 is highly desirable.  
The postdoctoral scholar will have the opportunity to work on a 5-year NIMH-funded study investigating the developmental trajectories of early temperament and attention in infancy, with a focus on risk for anxiety. The study will have three data collection sites—Penn State, University Park; Penn State-PACT in Harrisburg, PA; and the Child Study Center (http://www.childstudycenter-rutgers.com/) at Rutgers University, Newark led by Dr. Vanessa LoBue. The postdoctoral scholar will have his or her main hub at PSU-UP, but will interact extensively with all three sites. The study will incorporate a number of techniques, including electrophysiology (EEG & ERP), psychophysiology (RSA), eye-tracking, direct behavioral observation, and questionnaires. This work will take advantage of the University’s broad resources, including the Child Study Center (http://csc.psych.psu.edu/) and the PACT/HCHCD (http://www.pact.la.psu.edu ).
The postdoctoral scholar will primarily be responsible for collecting and analyzing electrophysiological and behavioral data and writing scientific papers and presentations. Other duties will include working with research assistants and graduate and undergraduate students.
Position qualifications include a Ph.D. in psychology, neuroscience, or a related field; experience with EEG acquisition and analysis; strong experimental and statistical skills; ability to work independently and in a team environment on multiple tasks and projects and to share one’s expertise with others. Experience with data collection platforms (e.g., BrainVision, Mindware, SMI), programming tasks (E-prime, Presentation), statistical analysis (R, SPSS, SAS) and general computing (MATLAB, Unix, Python) is highly desired. Excellent scientific writing skills are also desired.

Submit a letter of research interests, a CV, and contact information for three references. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Salary will conform to NIH guidelines. This is a fixed-term appointment funded for one year from date of hire with possibility of re-funding.  Apply online at https://psu.jobs/job/66770

CAMPUS SECURITY CRIME STATISTICS: For more about safety at Penn State, and to review the Annual Security Report which contains information about crime statistics and other safety and security matters, please go tohttp://www.police.psu.edu/clery/, which will also provide you with detail on how to request a hard copy of the Annual Security Report.

Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status.

 

Development of Social Cognition Lab, directed by Katherine Kinzler, recently moved to Cornell

The Development of Social Cognition Lab, directed by Katherine Kinzler, recently moved to Cornell from the University of Chicago.  We are looking to hire a Research Assistant and a Postdoctoral Fellow.  Start-date is flexible and review of applications will commence immediately.
 
The lab focuses on social-cognitive development, with an emphasis on how language marks social groups.  Current research areas of focus include: 1) The development of language as a social category; 2) NIH-funded research on food choice and social cognition; 3) Templeton-funded research on the social consequences of multilingual environments; 4) Moral development and intuitive approaches to law and psychology.  For more information, please see the lab’s website at dsclab.psych.cornell.edu
 
The research assistant will participate in all aspects of the research process, including working closely with graduate and undergraduate students, and recruiting child participants.  The postdoctoral fellow’s research program may vary depending on the postdoc’s interests, and the funding source available.

 
For the postdoctoral position, please send a CV, cover letter, and the names of 3 references to kinzler@cornell.edu.

Ziama Arkin Infancy Institute, at the Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, ISRAEL

Applications are welcomed for a fully funded postdoctoral research position at the Ziama Arkin Infancy Institute, at the Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, ISRAEL
 
Research focuses on the study of the early caregiving environment (including the home and infant daycare systems), development of the infant-caregiver relationship, and examination of neurophysiological, psychological and behavioral mechanisms through which this relationship shapes the development of infant socio-emotional capacities.
 
Research questions are examined in both normative and high-risk clinical populations (maternal/paternal postpartum psychopathology) with the objective of facilitating identification of moderators of risk and resilience. Translational research is aimed at informing the development and testing of intervention and prevention strategies for the perinatal period, as well as informing policy pertaining to perinatal care and “best practices” within the infant daycare systems.
 
The position is ideal for candidates interested in developmental translational neuroscience.
 
Position requirements include:
·        Ph.D. in neuroscience, developmental/clinical psychology, or a related field.
·        Strong skills in research methods and statistical analyses.
·        Experience with stimulus presentation programs (E-prime), and statistical analysis (MATLAB, MPlus, SPSS).
·        Excellent scientific writing skills.
 
Strong preference is given to applicants trained in EEG/ERP data acquisition and data analysis, and experience conducting developmental behavioral and/or neuroscience research.
 
The Ziama Arkin Infancy Institute, located in close proximity to the IDC campus in Herzliya, is comprised of both a clinical unit which specializes in parent-infant psychotherapy and a research unit – allowing for a collaborative dialogue between the two units. The fellowship is designed to provide training in the skills necessary to conduct original research in developmental translational neuroscience, as well as to foster the development of an independent research career. The laboratory provides ample opportunity for the development of innovative research in a highly collaborative training environment. Applicants are expected to lead the development of new studies as well as take an active role in the analysis and writing up of data previously and currently collected from ongoing research. Applicants should be able to work independently, but should be prepared to work collaboratively.
 
Research in the institute is conducted using multidisciplinary methodologies including behavioral observation, collection of electrophysiology (EEG) data, clinician administered interviews and self-report questionnaires. Research staff enjoy full access to laboratory facilities equipped with cutting edge technology. Facilities include fully integrated dense array EEG (suitable for use with infants and adults) and behavioral observation laboratories.
 
Position will be opened until filled, starting date is immediate. Ph.D. Doctoral degree must be completed or in final stages of submission by time of appointment. Please submit curriculum vita, and a sample of published or unpublished theoretical or empirical work to Dr. Tahli Frenkel, Director of research unit, Ziama Arkin Infancy Institute: tahl.frenkel@idc.ac.il

 

POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCHER, LEARNING AND COGNITION LAB, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCHER, LEARNING AND COGNITION
 LAB, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

The University of Maryland’s Learning and Cognition
 Lab, under the direction of Dr. Kelly Mix, seeks applicants for a postdoctoral researcher to support the implementation of research projects on the development of mathematics and numeracy concepts.  This position is partially funded by a newly approved DRK-12
 grant from the National Science Foundation that focuses on ways to improve children’s understanding of place value using cognitive science principles.  This is a collaborative research project that will be carried out in partnership with Dr. Linda Smith at
 Indiana University and a panel of expert consultants that includes Dr. Dedre Gentner (Northwestern University) and Dr. Art Baroody (Univ. of Illinois).

The postdoctoral researcher will help to develop
 a training protocol and test battery in collaboration with the PIs and our expert panel, interact with local school districts to recruit children to participate, and lead the data collection efforts.  There will also be important roles for data archiving,
 analysis, and publication.  Because this position is only partially funded by the NSF grant, there will be additional opportunities to develop separate research projects that align with the candidate’s and Dr. Mix’s research interests.   One such opportunity
 would be to further analyze an extensive dataset we collected for a project on spatial skill and mathematics with previous funding.  The position would be a two-year appointment with the possibility of extending to a third year.

The ideal candidate will have a doctoral degree
 in psychology or related field, and at least 2 years of experience working with children.   Excellent scientific writing skills and a strong background in statistical analysis are highly desired, as well as previous supervisory experience and effective project
 management skills.  An understanding of the school context (e.g., communicating with teachers and principals) would be a plus.

To apply, please send a letter of interest that
 describes your qualifications and reasons for interest in this position, along with your CV, two publications, and the contact information for three references to
kmix@umd.edu.
Use the subject line POSTDOC.  Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until the position is filled.
 Note that the University will perform background checks on all new hires prior to making a final offer of employment.

 

Postdoctoral Fellow The Preston Memory Lab Center for Learning and Memory Departments of Psychology & Neuroscience The University of Texas at Austin

Postdoctoral Fellow
The Preston Memory Lab
Center for Learning and Memory
Departments of Psychology & Neuroscience
The University of Texas at Austin

The Preston Lab (http://clm.utexas.edu/preston/) has an opening for a full time postdoctoral fellow. The lab’s research explores how we form new memories, how we remember past events, and how our memory for the past influences what we learn in the present. We are particularly interested in how our ability to effectively remember and reason about experience develops from the time we are children, and how this development relates to brain maturation.  The position will be supported by an NICHD-funded projectexamining how maturation of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex supports the development of memory and reasoning abilities in childhood and adolescence. The project will involve integration of behavioral, brain imaging, and computational modeling techniques.

We are seeking motivated individuals with a Ph.D. in neuroscience, psychology or a related field, previous experience with fMRI research, strong programming and quantitative skills, and a promising publication record. The initial appointment is for two years, renewable for additional years contingent upon performance. While the start date is negotiable, the ideal candidate will begin in Spring 2017.

To apply, please send a CV, a statement of research interests, and contact information for three references to apreston@utexas.edu. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis and will continue until the position is filled.

 

S.E.L.F Regulation Laboratory (http://self-regulationlab.fiu.edu/; PI Dr. Paulo Graziano, PhD)

The S.E.L.F Regulation Laboratory (http://self-regulationlab.fiu.edu/; PI Dr. Paulo Graziano, PhD) in collaboration with the Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory (http://dcn.fiu.edu; PI Dr. Anthony Dick, PhD) at Florida International University (Miami, FL) is seeking two postdoctoral fellows to participate in an NIMH funded study to examine the neurobiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in young children with a particular focus on their executive function and emotion regulation functioning. Candidates should have a PhD in psychology, developmental science, neuroscience, clinical science, or related discipline. The project will use neuropsychological tests, psychophysiology, diffusion-weighted imaging, and functional magnetic resonance imaging on children 5-7-years-old (with and without ADHD), and thus experience in neuroimaging data collection and analysis, and excellent computational and statistical know-how, is highly desired. Experience working with young children with developmental disabilities is a plus, as is a clinical science background.

The positions are for one year with the possibility of renewal for multiple years. Salary is $50,000 plus benefits. The positions are open immediately and we hope to fill them by November 1, 2016.

FIU is a multi-campus public research university located in Miami, a vibrant, international city. It has a recently established medical school that emphasizes medical research and community based medicine, and a new imaging facility with a 3 Tesla Siemens Prisma scanner. FIU offers more than 180 baccalaureate, masters, professional and doctoral degree programs to over 50,000 students.

Interested candidates should send application materials (curriculum vitae, sample publications, three references, and a letter describing research interests) directly to Dr. Paulo Graziano (pgrazian@fiu.edu) or Dr. Anthony Dick (adick@fiu.edu). Reviews of applications will begin immediately.

Clinical and Health Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowships

Clinical and Health Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowships

Cherokee Health Systems invites interested and qualified applicants to apply for its APPIC-member Clinical and Health Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship training program. The Child and Adolescent Psychology track is a combined placement providing psychological services in an outpatient community health clinic and consulting with the child welfare system. Fellows conduct clinical case reviews, assessment, psychological testing, and care coordination with child welfare; provide education and consultation to trainees and other community providers; and evaluate emotional disorders and administer programs of treatment in specialty behavioral health. The Integrated Health Psychology track trains fellows within a primary care setting to address the behavioral and psychosocial aspects of health. Fellows serve as Behavioral Health Consultants (BHC) on the primary care team, and as such, provide assessment, intervention, and consultation to the primary care patient panel. The Developmental Psychology track is focused on assessment, intervention, and parent/teacher training in autism and related disabilities. Fellows serve on the Autism Treatment Team, carry a case load of new referrals, conduct and interpret comprehensive evaluations, and schedule ongoing intervention sessions with children and families.
 
Completion of an APA accredited internship is required. For the Child and Adolescent and Integrated Health tracks, completion of an APA accredited PhD or PsyD Clinical/Counseling Psychology program is required; for the Developmental track, completion of an APA accredited PhD or PsyD in School or Development Psychology is required. Interested applicants should send a letter of interest and curriculum vitae to Sandra Greear at sandra.greear@cherokeehealth.com with the specific track of interest identified in the subject of the email.  Three letters of recommendation should be sent directly from the reference and may be sent electronically or mailed to Sandra Greear, Cherokee Health Systems, 2018 Western Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37921. For more information about Cherokee Health Systems and the postdoctoral fellowship program, please visit our website: www.cherokeehealth.com.

Postdoctoral Position in Educational Neuroscience & Cognitive Development of Mathematics

Postdoctoral Position in Educational Neuroscience & Cognitive Development of Mathematics

We seek a Postdoctoral Research Associate to work on a longitudinal behavioral and fMRI study of fractions processing (project summary below) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (PI Edward Hubbard; Co-PI Percival Matthews).  This is a 2-year appointment that will begin October 2016, with the possibility of extension for a third.

The ideal candidate will have a background in neuroimaging of numerical cognition, and especially working with imaging in developmental populations.  Experience with neuroimaging analysis programs (e.g., AFNI, FSL, SPM, or other relevant programs), stimulus presentation programs (e.g., E-prime, Presentation, Cogent/Psychtoolbox [MATLAB]), and statistical analysis (e.g., MATLAB, R, SPSS) is required. Excellent scientific writing skills and strong publication records are highly desired. Applicants should be able to work independently and with minimal supervision, but should also demonstrate interpersonal skills and an interesting in working collaboratively.

Please send a letter of interest describing graduate training and research interests, a CV, two publications and the names and contact information for three potential references, by electronic mail to emhubbard@wisc.edu with POSTDOC INQUIRY in the subject line.

Contact: Ed Hubbard
Email: emhubbard@wisc.edu

http://website.education.wisc.edu/edneurolab/
http://website.education.wisc.edu/pmatthews/

Project Summary
Mathematical competence is an important determinant of life chances in modern society, and knowledge of fractions is a foundational skill for establishing mathematical competence. Despite the importance of fraction knowledge, children and adults often encounter considerable difficulties understanding fractions. To explain these widespread difficulties, many researchers have argued for an innate constraints account. They propose that fractions are difficult because they do not correspond to any preexisting categories in our brain, unlike whole numbers, which correspond to sets of countable things. Thus, they argue fraction concepts are challenging because they do not benefit from existing cognitive abilities and instead must be learned through adapting children’s whole number understanding.

The study team proposes a competing hypothesis, the cognitive primitives account, which integrates previously unrelated findings from neuroscience, developmental psychology and education. We argue that a primitive ability that we dub the ratio processing system (RPS) is tuned to the processing of non-symbolic fractions—such as the relative length of two lines or the relative area of two figures—and is present even before formal instruction. On this view, children are equipped with cognitive mechanisms that support fraction concepts in the same way that the ability to process countable sets equips them to learn about whole numbers.

To test the predictions of these competing hypotheses, this project will follow two cohorts of children (2nd graders until 5th grade and 5th graders until 8th grade) using behavioral and brain imaging methods to (a) trace the development of non-symbolic fraction processing abilities, (b) determine how symbolic fraction knowledge builds on these abilities and (c) investigate whether individual differences in the RPS predict later math achievement. To test whether the acuity or recruitment of these non-symbolic architectures plays a role in fraction difficulties as well as general math learning difficulties, the study team will compare the behavioral performance and neural activity on a battery of cognitive tasks.

This research has important implications for our understanding of number processing and for designing educational practices that are optimal for fraction learning. Improving fractions understanding would help children to clear a critical hurdle in the acquisition of higher-order mathematical competencies that impact educational, employment, and even health outcomes. If cognitive primitives for non-symbolic fractions can provide a foundation for the acquisition of symbolic fraction ability, then instruction should attempt to recruit these primitives. If deficits in these primitives contribute to math learning difficulties, then screening should include measures of non-symbolic abilities and interventions should be designed to address these abilities.
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The University of Virginia's Early Development Lab, under the direction of Dr. Angeline Lillard,

The University of Virginia's Early Development Lab, under the direction of Dr. Angeline Lillard, seeks applicants for a Postdoctoral Research Associate to participate in research on pretend play in early childhood and/or Montessori education. Applicants with interest and experience in epigenetics and neuroimaging as they pertain to those topic areas are especially encouraged to apply. Candidates must have completed all requirements for a Ph.D. in Psychology or related field prior to the start date. Candidates must have at least 4 years of experience in conducting research with young children, time spent as a student will be considered. This is a one-year appointment; however, appointments may be renewed for an additional year, contingent upon available funding and satisfactory performance.

The University of Virginia is consistently ranked as a top public institution. Situated within iconic and historic Charlottesville, Virginia, with convenient airport and interstate access, we are located within one hour of Richmond and two hours of Washington D.C. Charlottesville is consistently ranked as one of the most livable cities in America. The postdoctoral affairs website at the following URL provides more information on resources for postdocs at the University of Virginia: http://postdoc.virginia.edu/.

To apply, candidates must complete a candidate profile through Jobs@UVa (https://jobs.virginia.edu) and electronically attach the following: cover letter, curriculum vitae, and the contact information for three professional references; search on posting number 0619053.

Review of applications is ongoing until filled. The start date is flexible.

Questions regarding the position and application process should be directed to Rich Haverstrom at rkh6j@virginia.edu.

The University will perform background checks on all new hires prior to making a final offer of employment.

The University of Virginia is an equal opportunity and affirmative action employer. Women, minorities, veterans, and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply. 

Post-doctoral Position in the Memory and Development Laboratory at UC Davis

Post-doctoral Position in the Memory and Development Laboratory at UC Davis
 
The UC Davis Memory and Development (MAD) lab, headed by Dr. Simona Ghetti, invites applications for a post-doctoral position. Research in the MAD lab examines the development of episodic memory using behavioral and neuroimaging techniques. The candidate selected for this NICHD-funded post-doctoral position will have the opportunity to examine the structural and functional contributions of the hippocampus to memory formation and retention in toddlers and preschoolers.
 
In addition, the selected candidate will have ample opportunity to contribute to the lab’s current research on the neural mechanisms underlying the development of memory in older children and adolescents by probing longitudinal databases currently available in the lab or by designing new studies. Individuals with a strong background in structural and functional MRI data analysis, including high-resolution hippocampal imaging, are particularly encouraged to apply.
 
Applicants must hold a PhD in psychology, neuroscience or a related field upon the start date. E-mail a CV and a brief statement of research interests to: sghetti@ucdavis.edu. Please inquire/apply by October 15, 2016. Ideal start date: Fall 2016/Winter 2017.
 

Postdoctoral Fellowship Position in Developmental and Learning Science

Postdoctoral Fellowship Position in Developmental and Learning Science

The School of Education, Department of Psychology, and Learning Research and Development Center (LRDC) at the University of Pittsburgh is accepting applications for a Postdoctoral Fellowship in child development with an emphasis on racial stigma stereotypes, identity development, and learning. The initial appointment will be one year with the possibility of renewal for a second year. The position involves work on several research projects exploring how sociocultural and racialized psychosocial factors influence racial minority students’ identity development and academic learning during middle childhood and early adolescence.

The work takes an interdisciplinary approach and applies questions and methods from psychological and education science to elementary and secondary school settings. Applicants must have a PhD and a track record of publication in psychology or education, substantive knowledge and background in the field of developmental psychology, child/adolescent development, learning science, and excellent academic writing and interpersonal skills. Strong quantitative skills (e.g., HLM, SEM, and growth modeling) or qualitative skills (esp. observations and interviewing), or experience with mixed methods approach are preferred. Experience with mathematics learning and/or research urban school contexts are also preferred.

The fellow will receive strong mentoring with well-established scholars focused on the demanding aspects of producing high quality scholarship. The fellow will be expected to build a research program by formulating research questions, generating research designs, writing grants, conducting analysis, and writing and presenting findings.

To apply for this position, please submit (1) a cover letter describing your research goals and training, including why your background and interests are a good match for the position, (2) Curriculum Vitae, (3) two writing samples, (4) three letters of reference to http://www.education.pitt.edu/facultysearch/. The online system will prompt applicants to request three letters of recommendation, directly.

Reviews of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Inquiries may be directed to Dr. Ming-Te Wang, at mtwang@pitt.edu, Dr. James Huguley, at Huguley@pitt.edu

LRDC is an internationally renowned center with the aim of promoting basic and applied research on learning in its cognitive, neural, social, and motivational aspects and to make research and human development links to formal and informal settings. Pittsburgh is repeatedly voted among “The Most Livable City”, with affordable cost of living and access to a wide array of seasonal recreation opportunities, professional and collegiate athletic events, and a vibrant cultural district.

postdoc for a project on children’s developing understanding of Theory of Mind and language

Dear colleagues,

We’re looking for a postdoc for a project on children’s developing understanding of Theory of Mind and language. The start date is January 2017, or shortly thereafter. The deadline for applications is September 30, 2016. The project is part of the ESRC International Center for Language and Communicative Development (http://www.lucid.ac.uk).

For further details about the job, see:

https://hr-jobs.lancs.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=A1630

The project is described here:

http://www.lucid.ac.uk/what-we-do/research/communication-theme/modal-and-mental-state-terms/

Please forward to colleagues and PhD students who are nearly finished.

Thank you!

Silke

Dr Silke Brandt
ESRC International Centre for Language and Communicative Development (LuCiD) | Lancaster University

Postdoctoral Fellows Program for Faculty Diversity, 2017-2019

Postdoctoral Fellows Program for Faculty Diversity, 2017-2019 apply.interfolio.com/35094

Program Description

The University of Maryland Baltimore County invites applications for the UMBC Postdoctoral Fellows Program for Faculty Diversity. UMBC is dedicated to ensuring a diverse, scholarly environment and encouraging outstanding individuals to enter the academic profession. The purpose of the Program is to support promising scholars who are committed to diversity in the academy and to prepare those scholars for possible tenure track appointments at UMBC. We are particularly interested in receiving applications from individuals who are members of groups that historically have been underrepresented in the professoriate.

UMBC will appoint recent recipients of the Ph.D. as Postdoctoral Fellows for a two-year term beginning July 1, 2017. The fellow will receive a starting stipend of $40,000, health benefits, $3,000 for conference travel and preparation of scholarly work, office space with computer, library and other privileges at the university. During the two-year term of appointment, the fellow will teach one course a year in the host department. All fellows are expected to be in residence during the academic year and participate in departmental seminars and related activities. Each fellow will be provided teaching and research mentors and specialized professional development opportunities across the campus. The remainder of the fellow’s time will be devoted to pursuing research.

Successful candidates for the Program will be selected on the basis of scholarly promise and potential to add to the diversity of the UMBC community. Applicants must have completed their doctoral degree when the term of appointment commences and must be no more than three years beyond receiving the Ph.D. Individuals awarded a Ph.D. from UMBC or currently holding a postdoctoral or faculty position at UMBC are not eligible.

Fields

Applications for study in any field represented at UMBC are welcome. Please specify up to three fields of interest. Applicants with interdisciplinary research interests will be assigned to more than one department/program.

Stipend

$40,000 a year.

Eligibility

Applicants who will have completed the doctoral degree no later than July 1, 2017 and no earlier than July 1, 2014 are eligible to apply. Preference will be given to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.

Application Instructions

To apply, please visit apply.interfolio.com/35094

Deadline

Full consideration will be given to those applicants that submit all materials to apply.interfolio.com/35094 by November 4, 2016. A complete submission will consist of:

  1. 1)  CoverLetter

  2. 2)  Curriculum Vitae

  3. 3)  Three Letters of Reference

  4. 4)  Statement of Proposed Research Plan during fellowship (2-3 Pages)

5)

  1. 6)  Writing Sample (1-2 samples, 35 page max, e.g., dissertation chapter, journal article)

  2. 7)  List of up to three fields of interest that are represented at UMBC (1 Page)

    INCOMPLETE SUBMISSIONS WILL NOT BE REVIEWED

Review and Selection

Applications will be reviewed by the appropriate department(s)/program(s), Dean(s) and the Provost’s Selection Committee. Semi-finalists will be announced in mid-January and finalists will be invited to campus for interviews in mid-February. Awardees will be notified in early March.

Contact Information

Questions regarding the program may be addressed to:

Dr. Autumn Reed, Coordinator for Faculty Diversity Office of the Provost
University of Maryland Baltimore County Baltimore, MD 21250 410-455-1099/autumn2@umbc.edu www.umbc.edu/facultydiversity

Personal Statement that details your demonstrated commitment to diversity and why you

should be selected for this fellowship (1-3 Pages)

Postdoctoral Fellowship Position in Developmental and Learning Science

Postdoctoral Fellowship Position in Developmental and Learning Science

The School of Education, Department of Psychology, and Learning Research and Development Center (LRDC) at the University of Pittsburgh is accepting applications for a Postdoctoral Fellowship in child development with an emphasis on racial stigma stereotypes, identity development, and learning. The initial appointment will be one year with the possibility of renewal for a second year. The position involves work on several research projects exploring how sociocultural and racialized psychosocial factors influence racial minority students’ identity development and academic learning during middle childhood and early adolescence.

The work takes an interdisciplinary approach and applies questions and methods from psychological and education science to elementary and secondary school settings. Applicants must have a PhD and a track record of publication in psychology or education, substantive knowledge and background in the field of developmental psychology, child/adolescent development, learning science, and excellent academic writing and interpersonal skills. Strong quantitative skills (e.g., HLM, SEM, and growth modeling) or qualitative skills (esp. observations and interviewing), or experience with mixed methods approach are preferred. Experience with mathematics learning and/or research urban school contexts are also preferred.

The fellow will receive strong mentoring with well-established scholars focused on the demanding aspects of producing high quality scholarship. The fellow will be expected to build a research program by formulating research questions, generating research designs, writing grants, conducting analysis, and writing and presenting findings.

To apply for this position, please submit (1) a cover letter describing your research goals and training, including why your background and interests are a good match for the position, (2) Curriculum Vitae, (3) two writing samples, (4) three letters of reference to http://www.education.pitt.edu/facultysearch/. The online system will prompt applicants to request three letters of recommendation, directly.

Reviews of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Inquiries may be directed to Dr. Ming-Te Wang, at mtwang@pitt.edu, Dr. James Huguley, at Huguley@pitt.edu

LRDC is an internationally renowned center with the aim of promoting basic and applied research on learning in its cognitive, neural, social, and motivational aspects and to make research and human development links to formal and informal settings. Pittsburgh is repeatedly voted among “The Most Livable City”, with affordable cost of living and access to a wide array of seasonal recreation opportunities, professional and collegiate athletic events, and a vibrant cultural district.